Changing the World with Creativity and Innovation

Be inspired and learn from a panel of innovators and creators who are making a positive change in the world and making people's lives better
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Creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship are skills that make a positive change in the world and make people's lives better. Our panel of creative and social innovators are creating technology solutions for blind people and those with disabilities, using theatre to challenge dominant stereotypes surrounding Pasifika people, investing in social ventures, and embedding creative thinking across the public and private sectors. The night’s lineup is:

  • Associate Professor Suranga Nanayakkara, Auckland Bioengineering Institute and Director, Augmented Human Lab
  • Christine Losecaat MBE, CEO of Little Dipper
  • Dr Michelle Johannsson from Southside Rise
  • Dr Deb Shepherd, University of Auckland and Soul Capital

Don’t miss your opportunity to be inspired and learn from these incredible people who are changing the world.

This event is brought to you by ATEED, Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Unleash Space, the Creative Thinking Project and WeCreate. 

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Creative
  • Health
  • Social Enterprise
  • Wearables
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Speakers

Not only, did Christine win a Prime Time Emmy in 1996 for her part as co-producer of Peter & the Wolf, she has created, designed and delivered some impressive programmes and events, including The British Business Embassy at Lancaster House during the London 2012 Olympic Games.
Deb is a highly experienced investor, director, and adviser to entrepreneurial SMEs. She is also co-author of the book 'Changing gears: How to take your Kiwi business from the kitchen table to the board table'. Deb's research and teaching focuses on entrepreneurship and innovation.
Michelle is a Polynesian theatre-maker, doctoral scholar and former high school dropout. South Auckland, decile one born and bred, she is proud to work in the spaces where Education, Equity and the Performing Arts meet for Young Brown Scholars.
Suranga's work explores ways of creating ‘enabling’ human-computer interfaces as natural extensions of our body, mind and behaviour. Along with his team, they use technology to tackle "human" issues, where they are not just exciting or novel, but have a meaningful impact on the way people live.
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