Future Fashion

New materials and processes are changing the fashion industry. Come listen to our panel and make a piece of wearable tech of your own.
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These are exciting times - leather jackets can be grown from bacteria, dresses 3D printed, t-shirts cut out by laser cutters from patterns downloaded from the internet and embedded with fabric sensors . Fashion is one of the biggest and most polluting industries worldwide, but is one that is rapidly changing due to technological change at grassroots and industry level.

Future Fashion will start with an introduction by Bridget McKendry of Fab Lab CHCH on the new smart materials, processes and social trends that are shaping how we will consume fashion and textiles in the next few years - covering soft digital fabrication, wearable technology, sustainability and materials.

Following this will be a panel discussion with a nano materials scientist, a designer focused on sustainable contemporary clothing, a fashion design educator and a fashionista, where we ask the question "What are the implications of high tech fashion on the evolution of style and emerging trends?"

There will be examples of the new materials mentioned in the presentation on display and attendees will have the opportunity to get hands on and create a piece of wearable tech to take home.

This event is for anyone interested in fashion, clothing and textiles, trends, smart and responsive materials, art, craft, science, education. Those who might not normally be interested in digital technology but love to experiment with new mediums should attend, as well as practitioners in creative industries, fashion design and education, functional clothing, and teachers.

  • 3D Printing
  • Advanced Materials
  • Education
  • Nanotechnology
  • Wearables
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Speakers

Bridget founded Fab Lab CHCH, part of the international Fab Lab network, in 2014 with Carl Pavletich.
A multi-displinary designer with a deep interest in electronics, art and textiles, and what happens when they intersect. She spends most of her time designing educational kits and programmes.
Craig is currently electrospinning super-hydrophobic nanofibers, that have the capacity to create self-cleaning and very water resistant surfaces.
Steven Park runs the label "6x4", producing one-off garments, shoes, and accessories by hand. The materials and processes he uses come from a need to be resourceful in a world of limited resources.
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