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Synthesis: An Exploration of 3D-Printed Musical Instruments

Be part of history as we showcase Aotearoa New Zealand’s first 3D-printed musical instruments.

Register on Eventbrite

Date and time:

Tue 17 10:00 AM - Sun 22 May 4:00 PM

In person

Auckland

Depot Artspace, 28 Clarence Street, Devonport, Auckland 0624

Free

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Synthesis: An Exploration of 3D-Printed Musical Instruments

Curious about how the impossible is turned into the possible?

Come check out “Synthesis” and be part of history as we showcase Aotearoa New Zealand’s first 3D-printed musical instruments. This interactive exhibition will be on display throughout the month of May, with a special performance and opening night on Friday 13 May, 5-7pm.

Depot Artspace in partnership with Xero are thrilled to host this exhibition as part of Techweek and New Zealand Music Month.

This exhibition demonstrates the intersection between art and 3D-printed technology, whilst also demonstrating the creative opportunities of additive manufacturing technology.

The 3D-printed instruments will be on display from 7-28 May 2022, where visitors of all ages can test-drive various instruments and leave with their very own 3D-printed object using our onsite 3D-printer!

Opening night on Friday 13 May, 5-7pm will feature an introduction from Professor Olaf Diegel from The University of Auckland’s Creative Design and Additive Manufacturing Lab, who will share insights on the intersection between art and 3D-printed technology.

This will be followed by New Zealand’s first-ever 3D-printed live performance with our special musical guests playing the 3D-printed instruments. Visitors will also have an opportunity to view and play the 3D-printed instruments.

Refreshments will be provided throughout the evening.

We acknowledge support from The University of Auckland’s Creative Design and Additive Manufacturing Lab for contributing to this special exhibition.

"For innovation, you need to be able to fail fast and fail often. With additive manufacturing, you can now fail extra fast and extra often. And that's a good thing..."

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